Articles Tagged "book review"

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Christians with Depression by Michelle Pearce, PhD is a phenomenal guide to treating religious clients suffering from a depressive episode. It not only provides an evidence based treatment model, but exemplifies the importance of compassion and respect for the client and their values and beliefs that they bring to therapy. Although […]

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In the competition between therapy modalities in the United States today, group psychotherapy is clearly on the ropes. As I write these words, the Commission for the Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology (CRSPPP) of the American Psychological Association is considering another petition offered by APA Division 49 (Group Psychotherapy) to have group […]

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Henry Kronengold (2017) invites readers to experience with him a “curious space” of relational connections, playfulness, symbols, and metaphors that characterize psychotherapy with children and adolescents. What is it like for both client and therapist as they tentatively begin a therapeutic relationship, find common channels of communication, solve problems, and make sense of life’s experiences? […]

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Although the existing group art therapy literature focuses on identifying art therapy directives and describing the root of group psychotherapy as being geared toward verbal therapy (Liebmann, 2004; Steinbach, 2014), there has been a gap in the literature when it comes to describing the healing components of art in group work. The second edition of […]

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If you are a psychotherapist of a certain age you no doubt remember the 1982 New York Times Magazine article on Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (STDP; Davanloo, 1980) by journalist Dava Sobel. In contrasting STDP (“the most aggressive form of psychic medicine to rest on the principles of Sigmund Freud”) to traditional psychoanalytic psychotherapy, Sobel noted, […]

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Currently, there is a paradigm clash between different visions of the nature of psychotherapy. The clash is not merely about what psychotherapy is, how it helps, and how it should be practiced. It is also about the nature of scientific evidence and what the evidence shows about effective practice. In the forward to this book […]

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In Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence, Derald Wing Sue (2015) discusses reasons that make discussions of race and racism difficult, even in psychotherapy. The author describes the master narrative of Whites and the counter-narratives of people of Color as dialogical exchanges that often result in unproductive conversations about race. The book addresses the […]

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Jeremy Holmes (2014) offers here a book, rich with the wisdom of an experienced clinician, that celebrates the imagination as an essential component of the psychotherapeutic process, using examples from literature to provide insight into important aspects of clinical work. He argues that literature and psychodynamic therapy share an “aesthetics” based upon a “paradoxical combination […]

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Healing the Incest Wound, originally published in 1988, was a landmark achievement in the modern era of trauma psychiatry and psychology. Christine Courtois, PhD is one of the pioneers who helped rediscover the long-neglected effects of pandemic childhood sexual abuse and to introduce treatment models that could help incest victims reclaim their lives. The original […]

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This is a relationship road map; a manual for relationships that leads to successful communication, listening skills, and ultimate connection between two people. Illustrating twenty-five crucial turning points, the author raises the reader’s consciousness about critical individual and relationship decisions. Readers learn how to translate the abstract emotions of everyday life into concrete expressions, making […]

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