Articles Tagged "feedback"

“Do that scale again.” “Do that fingering transition again.” “Let me hear that again.”  Even if the scale was correct, it had to be done…again. As a novice musician, the word, “again,” became synonymous with repetitive practice. Practice for the sake of practice, because practice makes perfect. I (voice of 3rd author; true story) had […]

The proliferation of different social media platforms provides the global community the opportunity to transmit information and opinions at lightening quick speed via countless unique venues. As we have seen in recent history, social media has not only offered an avenue for social engagement, but it has also led to cultivating tangible changes in our […]

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When I began graduate school, as a child of the 90s, I thought I was punked into a game of competitive Minesweeper, the classic computer game won by avoiding bombs. I was taking risks, questioning the status quo and, in my mind, attempting to obtain a quality education, which includes feedback from my peers. By […]

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When psychologists believe that there may have been an ethical violation by another psychologist, they attempt to resolve the issue by bringing it to the attention of that individual, if an informal resolution appears appropriate and the intervention does not violate any confidentiality rights that may be involved. (American Psychological Association, 2010, Standard 1.04) Given […]

Domain Note: The Role of Deliberate Practice across the Professional Lifespan The Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy Education and Training Committee is excited to be providing a series of articles on the role of deliberate practice (DP) in the development of highly effective psychotherapists. The initial article (Love, Davis, & Callahan, 2016) focused on […]

Clinical supervision has changed dramatically in the past decade. First came the recognition that clinical supervision is a distinct professional practice that requires specific training. This represented a critical change from the previously unspoken assumption that all supervisors were, by virtue of their status, competent—an assumption that elicited strong emotional responses from both supervisees and […]

In the Fall 2015 semester we completed a graduate course in clinical supervision. We discussed the purpose of clinical supervision, ethical and legal issues, theoretical models, countertransference and interpersonal variables impacting supervision, evaluation and feedback, how to build specific trainee skills, working with impaired trainees, and supervisor self-care. A frequent reaction for all of us (including […]

“The humble man makes room for progress; the proud man believes he is already there.” Ed Parker (1983) In their series of articles, Tracey and colleagues (Tracey, Wampold, Goodyear, & Lichtenberg, 2015; Tracey, Wampold, Lichtenberg, & Goodyear, 2014) explore barriers psychotherapists face in developing expertise. Specifically, Tracey et al. (2014, 2015) noted that psychotherapists often (a) […]

Abstract A serious problem in routine clinical practice is clinician optimism about the benefit clients derive from the therapy that they offer compared to measured benefits. The consequence of seeing the silver lining is a failure to identify cases that, in the end, leave treatment worse-off than when they started or are simply unaffected. It […]

A recent body of psychotherapy research is converging on the benefits of using client process and outcome feedback in clinical practice (Lambert & Shimokawa, 2011). Continual client feedback, also known as “routine outcomes monitoring,” “progress monitoring,” or “practice-based evidence,” refers to the collection of self-report data (e.g., symptoms, well-being, and the therapeutic alliance) from clients […]