Articles Tagged "progress monitoring"

The practice of psychotherapy is not an easy task. Many psychotherapists are balancing multiple responsibilities and roles at any given moment. As clinicians, they have to conduct assessments, develop case conceptualizations and treatment plans, relate to their patients therapeutically, and deliver interventions effectively. As mental health providers, they have to find time to manage responsibilities […]

Be the 1st to vote.

Introduction In the course of a program of research aimed at preventing treatment failure our research group at Brigham Young University has had the opportunity to track the session-by-session treatment progress of clients undergoing psychotherapy. These clients have received treatment in a wide variety of clinics and in private practice as well as inpatient care. […]

Abstract A serious problem in routine clinical practice is clinician optimism about the benefit clients derive from the therapy that they offer compared to measured benefits. The consequence of seeing the silver lining is a failure to identify cases that, in the end, leave treatment worse-off than when they started or are simply unaffected. It […]

Be the 1st to vote.

A recent body of psychotherapy research is converging on the benefits of using client process and outcome feedback in clinical practice (Lambert & Shimokawa, 2011). Continual client feedback, also known as “routine outcomes monitoring,” “progress monitoring,” or “practice-based evidence,” refers to the collection of self-report data (e.g., symptoms, well-being, and the therapeutic alliance) from clients […]

Be the 1st to vote.