Articles Tagged "supervisee"

In 2012, the American Psychological Association (APA) endorsed as policy, The Education and Training Guidelines: A Taxonomy for Education and Training in Professional Psychology Health Service Specialties, hereafter referred to as “the Taxonomy.” This Taxonomy was developed in response to confusing inconsistencies across education and training in professional psychology training programs that would describe offerings […]

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Have you ever seen anyone else doing supervision—except your own? Whenever I am giving a workshop on clinical supervision to psychotherapy supervisors, I ask if any of them have every seen another psychologist supervising a trainee, let along watched a master supervisor doing so. On every occasion, only a few hands go up. Although clinical […]

Counseling psychology has demonstrated a long-standing interest and respect for clinical supervision as a unique domain that warrants its own preparation for practice. Counseling psychologists have distinguished themselves in the supervision literature (e.g., Borders et al., 1991; Goodyear et al., 2000), and counseling psychology programs have been much more likely than clinical and school psychology […]

In an era when many in our field are preoccupied with defining the nature of empirically supported psychotherapies (e.g., American Psychological Association, 2006) and empirically supported therapy relationships (e.g., Norcross, 2011), it was only a matter of time until those responsible for training therapists began to ask whether there are yet any empirically supported methods […]

Clinical supervision has changed dramatically in the past decade. First came the recognition that clinical supervision is a distinct professional practice that requires specific training. This represented a critical change from the previously unspoken assumption that all supervisors were, by virtue of their status, competent—an assumption that elicited strong emotional responses from both supervisees and […]

In the Fall 2015 semester we completed a graduate course in clinical supervision. We discussed the purpose of clinical supervision, ethical and legal issues, theoretical models, countertransference and interpersonal variables impacting supervision, evaluation and feedback, how to build specific trainee skills, working with impaired trainees, and supervisor self-care. A frequent reaction for all of us (including […]

In the last 20 to 30 years, we have come a long way when it comes to practicing with sexual minority clients (King, Semlyn, Killaspy, Nazareth, & Osborn, 2007). Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) identities are affirmed and celebrated rather than pathologized, and affirmative psychotherapy is now the preferred practice approach for working with this […]

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There are several sources of this conflict or dilemma. As they learn to do the work of what Freud (1937) termed an “impossible profession” (p. 401), beginning therapists are typically beset with multiple stressors, including a greater awareness of their own personal issues; the myriad of difficulties and frustrations inherent to treatment per se; the […]

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We’re taking this opportunity to raise an issue that’s sorely neglected in our professional dialogue, namely sexual harassment in the context of psychotherapy supervision. As far as we could discover, the topic of “sexual intimacies” (Bartell & Rubin, 1990) or “sexual boundary violations” (Koenig & Spano, 2004) did not appear in the supervision literature until […]

In my supervision practice, I work with doctoral students at the beginning of their work as therapists. These students have either had no therapeutic experience or limited experience. As Chessick (1971) indicated, three critical issues often confront therapists in their shift from classroom to clinic: (a) learning to manage anxiety early on during the treatment […]