Articles Tagged "competence" (Page 2)

Clinical supervision has changed dramatically in the past decade. First came the recognition that clinical supervision is a distinct professional practice that requires specific training. This represented a critical change from the previously unspoken assumption that all supervisors were, by virtue of their status, competent—an assumption that elicited strong emotional responses from both supervisees and […]

With the growing emphasis on Evidence-Based Psychotherapies (EBPs) it is important to take notice that in the community there are generally no assurances of fidelity to a treatment methodology. Consider the following scenario: A young man experiencing symptoms of Panic Disorder is advised by a savvy primary care physician to seek psychotherapy. This gentleman does […]

Psychotherapists have numerous obligations to our clients that exist with the intent of ensuring that our clients’ best interests are paramount in our thinking and resulting actions. Jorgenson, Hirsch, and Wahl (1997) describe the responsibilities inherent in the psychotherapy relationship as a fiduciary responsibility to one’s clients. As they explain this relationship and responsibility: Generally, […]

Imagine: You’ve been in an accident. Now, your thinking is clouded and unclear, you are terrified that you have lost your ability to reason and think clearly and it might never return, and you have a caseload of clients. What would you do? If you didn’t (or couldn’t) turn to anyone, is there someone in […]

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Download a free accompanying PowerPoint presentation from Dr. Barnett here. Clinical supervision is an essential aspect of the training of every psychotherapist (Bernard & Goodyear, 2014). It supplements and significantly adds to the academic education that those in training receive. Clinical supervision received during one’s training can lay the foundation for the neophyte psychotherapist’s clinical […]

Download a free accompanying Power Point presentation from Dr. Barnett here: Integrating_Religion_and_Spirituality.ppt It may be easy for psychotherapists to overlook or avoid addressing our clients’ spirituality and religion in psychotherapy. Such issues may not have been addressed in our training and thus may not be seen as relevant to our clinical work with clients. After all, we […]

“… when all four levels of the systems contextual framework were accounted for, and when training involved active learning (e.g., practice in delivery of interventions, feedback, coaching), therapist adherence to EBP was improved and client change occurred.”

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Taline Andonian Asks As graduate students we receive training not only in academia but in a myriad of different clinical settings, which often lead to a wide range of experiences in terms of supervision. Because of the emphasis that is placed on clinical/practical training for clinical psychology programs in particular a graduate student’s competencies are […]

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Question by Faith Prelli I have a client (18yr female) who I have seen twice a week for 8 months who is currently in a relationship plagued with intimate partner violence. This has been dubbed “mutual combat” by several of my co-workers, but in exploration with her, it appears as though the severity of his […]

Key ingredients needed for training of evidence-based practice are summarized by Ken Critchfield and Sarah Knox: scientific-mindedness, critical thinking, integrative ability, and relational skill.

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