Articles Tagged "research" (Page 2)

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Jan 28, 2018

Pregnancy loss is an umbrella term for the death of a conceptus, fetus, or neonate before the 21st day of life and affects a substantial amount of women and their partners. It has been estimated that 20-50% of all pregnancies end in miscarriage, or the loss of a pregnancy before 20 weeks gestation. Moreover, about […]

An important aspect of psychotherapy is the therapist’s reactions to his or her client during session (Kahn & Fromm, 2001; Summers & Barber, 2010). One type of emotional expression that has garnered interest throughout the psychological literature is the phenomenon of therapists crying with their patients (McWilliams, 1994; Alden, 2001; Summers & Barber, 2010; Guntrip, […]

Psychotherapy termination is that moment in which therapists and clients say goodbye (or “call me if you need me”). As part of the first author’s doctoral dissertation, we conducted a research study in which we asked former clients about their treatment. Surprisingly, when clients were asked about their treatment, many started the recount by addressing […]

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Nov 6, 2017

The past 100 years of psychotherapy research has sought not only to examine the efficacy and effectiveness of psychotherapy, but also to identify the causal mechanisms and processes underlying therapeutic change (Lambert, 2013; Wampold & Imel, 2015). The existing research on psychotherapy processes has provided us with a rich understanding of several variables that are […]

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Oct 24, 2017

Within the conceptual literature, multicultural therapeutic approaches have long recognized therapist self-disclosure as a skill or even competency (Bitar, Kimball, Bermúdez, & Drew, 2014; Henretty & Levitt, 2010). Self-disclosure has been discussed as an intervention that may build trust and credibility in cross-cultural contexts (Constantine & Kwan, 2003; Henretty & Levitt, 2010). Disclosure may suggest […]

Communication With the General Public If you were to meet me at a party, you might be forgiven for thinking that I am being purposefully rather vague about what I do for a living. When people ask me, I tend to answer with something like: “. . . I am a psychotherapist.” After the usual […]

Theoretical Background In individualistic Western cultures, the concept of enmeshment denotes that there can be too much loyalty and interdependence within a family; this idea intersects in challenging ways with the high degree of loyalty that is central to Arab family values. In varying cultural contexts, extreme togetherness may be preferred by family members as […]

Psychotherapists as Scientist Practitioners Research is important in the scientific field of psychotherapy, where we tend to think of ourselves as “scientist-practitioners” (Overholser, 2012). Although some psychologists are active researchers and clinicians, the importance of consuming research and research productivity as well as the attitudes toward science and research evidence might differ per setting (e.g., […]

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Aug 6, 2017

Considerable literature exists on the value of supporting first-generation college students (FGCS) since Billson and Terry (1982) coined the term, “first-generation college student” to describe students whose parents did not attend college. However, there is limited research on first-generation graduate students (FGGS), especially those in health service psychology programs. Motivated in part by the American […]

The ethical conduct of research and the dissemination of its results are essential for the field of psychotherapy and for all psychotherapists. Ongoing research provides us with new insights, and expanding one's knowledge base directly impacts the clinical services provided to clients. Without ongoing research, the mental health profession would stagnate and the public served […]

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