Articles Tagged "self-care" (Page 2)

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Oct 30, 2019

In the hectic pace of being an early career psychologist (ECP) and junior faculty member, it is often more possible to extol the virtues of self-care rather than to authentically engage in it. In many cases, this challenge may partially stem from limited education and insufficient opportunity to develop effective self-care habits during doctoral training. […]

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Oct 30, 2019

Like other helping professions (e.g., physical health service providers), psychotherapists are expected to serve clients without expecting anything in return (Guy, 2000). Although the helping within psychotherapy is unidirectional, therapy involves a bidirectional flow in which the client and the therapist impact each other (Kottler, 2010). The role of a psychotherapist departs from other helping […]

Psychology graduate students face many challenges, balancing academic demands, field placement requirements, often financial limitations, and the responsibilities of personal life. These competing obligations can often lead to burnout, defined by the Mayo Clinic as “a state of physical or emotional exhaustion that also involves a sense of reduced accomplishment and loss of personal identity” […]

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Sep 2, 2019

The creation of art is known to offer a variety of benefits for physical and mental well-being, but in our rush to categorize production of art as “self-care,” we may be overlooking the most essential piece. This article explores the idea that dismissing the work of passion as one more task to check off a […]

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Sep 2, 2019

In my last article I listed four retirement myths: It is easy to retire from an active professional life to a less active lifestyle;  Retired people do not want to work;  Retired people do not want to be paid; and  Retired people have unlimited free time (Barrett, 2018). In that article I admitted to having […]

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Jul 21, 2019

In my last article I listed four retirement myths: It is easy to retire from an active professional life to a less active lifestyle; Retired people do not want to work; Retired people do not want to be paid; Retired people have unlimited free time In that article I admitted to having retired three times. […]

Supervision will be introduced to students in many graduate cohorts as an aspect of their training they will both enjoy and endure. Framing it this way inherently leads students to start to question what they want in a supervisor. Some will think of the worst and ponder what it would be like to have a […]

Introduction Perceived safety in the supervisor-supervisee relationship can influence the level of supervisee self-disclosure (e.g., of mistakes, countertransference, or personal factors such as self-care; Gunn & Pistole, 2012), as well as supervisee outcomes (e.g., self-awareness and self-confidence in session with clients; Johnston & Milne, 2012; Wheeler & Richards, 2007). The development of safety in this […]

Advocacy and clinical psychology are inseparable. All good psychologists advocate for their clients’ overall well-being, effective treatment, and access to needed resources. Given that larger societal issues impact the mental health of the individual, it is important that this advocacy role generalizes beyond our therapy offices. Clients enter therapy shouldering an enormous load of struggles […]

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Apr 15, 2019

Clinical Psychology Training in Australia Currently in Australia there are over 35,000 registered psychologists. There are multiple pathways to registration as a psychologist within Australia, including a combination of undergraduate Bachelor degree, supervised practice, and/or postgraduate studies. Many students choose to undertake a postgraduate training program within a university setting. Postgraduate training programs include a […]