Articles Tagged "trainee" (Page 2)

Clinical supervision has changed dramatically in the past decade. First came the recognition that clinical supervision is a distinct professional practice that requires specific training. This represented a critical change from the previously unspoken assumption that all supervisors were, by virtue of their status, competent—an assumption that elicited strong emotional responses from both supervisees and […]

In the Fall 2015 semester we completed a graduate course in clinical supervision. We discussed the purpose of clinical supervision, ethical and legal issues, theoretical models, countertransference and interpersonal variables impacting supervision, evaluation and feedback, how to build specific trainee skills, working with impaired trainees, and supervisor self-care. A frequent reaction for all of us (including […]

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Jan 31, 2016

In the last 20 to 30 years, we have come a long way when it comes to practicing with sexual minority clients (King, Semlyn, Killaspy, Nazareth, & Osborn, 2007). Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) identities are affirmed and celebrated rather than pathologized, and affirmative psychotherapy is now the preferred practice approach for working with this […]

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There are several sources of this conflict or dilemma. As they learn to do the work of what Freud (1937) termed an “impossible profession” (p. 401), beginning therapists are typically beset with multiple stressors, including a greater awareness of their own personal issues; the myriad of difficulties and frustrations inherent to treatment per se; the […]

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We’re taking this opportunity to raise an issue that’s sorely neglected in our professional dialogue, namely sexual harassment in the context of psychotherapy supervision. As far as we could discover, the topic of “sexual intimacies” (Bartell & Rubin, 1990) or “sexual boundary violations” (Koenig & Spano, 2004) did not appear in the supervision literature until […]

Ample research suggests that therapists differ in their level of effectiveness (Baldwin & Imel, 2013; Blow, Sprenkle, & Davis, 2007; Wampold, 2001). Even more striking is that therapist effects appear to be larger than treatment effects (Kim, Wampold, & Bolt, 2006; Lindgren, Folkesson, & Almiqvist, 2010). Moreover, therapist training, experience, and theoretical orientation do not […]

In my supervision practice, I work with doctoral students at the beginning of their work as therapists. These students have either had no therapeutic experience or limited experience. As Chessick (1971) indicated, three critical issues often confront therapists in their shift from classroom to clinic: (a) learning to manage anxiety early on during the treatment […]

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Apr 30, 2015

I’ll never forget the day that a friend of mine quoted a professor from my university: “The only way you can screw up as a psychologist is by having sex with your clients. As long as you don’t do that, you’re set!” Forgive the crass language, but the words and tone used at the time […]

It has long been assumed that asking a supervisee to explore her conscious and unconscious feelings toward a client will help her work with that client, understand herself better, and ultimately facilitate her professional development (e.g., Ekstein & Wallerstein, 1972; Kagan, 1984). Underlying this assumption is an appreciation for the therapist as the instrument of […]

Download a free accompanying PowerPoint presentation from Dr. Barnett here. Clinical supervision is an essential aspect of the training of every psychotherapist (Bernard & Goodyear, 2014). It supplements and significantly adds to the academic education that those in training receive. Clinical supervision received during one’s training can lay the foundation for the neophyte psychotherapist’s clinical […]