Articles Tagged "evidence-based practice"

Homeless and vulnerable individuals experience higher rates of mental health difficulties (National Institute of Mental Health, 2017) and are less likely to receive mental health care than the general population. Many of them meet criteria for multiple chronic psychological and medical morbidities (for example, severe mental illness, substance misuse, and diabetes) in addition to facing […]

Psychotherapy as a field is no stranger to controversy, so let’s start with where we all agree. If you are a member of Division 29, chances are you believe in the mission of this organization which is to make the benefits of psychotherapy accessible to all. Next, we may agree that individuals with mental health […]

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Aug 18, 2019

The evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP) movement can be considered a response to the medicalization of psychology, where pharmaceuticals are at risk of becoming the primary treatment option. The “year of the brain” illuminated connections between neurobiological markers and psychological phenomena, and as Paris (2015) argues, the field of psychiatry welcomed neuropsychology as a means […]

Almost 10 years ago, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established national initiatives to provide training and consultation in two evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Karlin et al., 2010): Prolonged Exposure (PE; Foa, Hembree, & Rothbaum, 2007) and Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT; Resick & Schnicke, 1993). In addition, a number of […]

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Jan 29, 2017

Evidence-based practice in psychology has been defined as the integration of the best available research, clinical expertise, and the individual client’s characteristics, values, and preferences (APA, 2006). This definition suggests that psychotherapists should be able, and willing, to integrate techniques from different theoretical orientations based on the context. Although integration is important, it is also […]

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is one of the largest comprehensive health care systems in the world. Although unique in some regards, it can serve as an ideal laboratory to study the implementation of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) given the abundance of federal funding and top-down administrative support. The VA provides an organized, centralized […]

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Aug 16, 2015

A recent body of psychotherapy research is converging on the benefits of using client process and outcome feedback in clinical practice (Lambert & Shimokawa, 2011). Continual client feedback, also known as “routine outcomes monitoring,” “progress monitoring,” or “practice-based evidence,” refers to the collection of self-report data (e.g., symptoms, well-being, and the therapeutic alliance) from clients […]

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May 7, 2012

In a provocative discussion of evidence-based psychological practices (EBPPs), Mozdzierz, Peluso, and Lisiecki (2011) posit that the question for mental health practitioners is not can EBPPs be used, but under what circumstances and how should they be applied. Moreover, the authors suggest that in addition to the current empirical focus on EBPPs, other areas remain […]

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Key ingredients needed for training of evidence-based practice are summarized by Ken Critchfield and Sarah Knox: scientific-mindedness, critical thinking, integrative ability, and relational skill.