Articles Tagged "mindfulness"

Over the past decade, the practice of mindfulness has received a significant amount of attention in the psychotherapy research literature. The existing research on mindfulness has demonstrated that it can produce positive health and mental health benefits for psychotherapy clients (Davis & Hayes, 2011). A smaller body of research has also demonstrated that the practice […]

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As psychologists, our work is built upon our ability to communicate, understand others, provide interpersonal feedback, navigate conflict, and lean into discomfort – all in the service of our clients.  While graduate training programs emphasize clinical theory, research, and application, they rarely teach graduate students about how to use their knowledge and skills to handle […]

Adding to the neurological research findings on the benefits of meditation, a recent study found that long-term meditators who are age 50 and older have a younger brain age than non-meditators (Luders, Cherbuin, & Gaser, 2016). Using a validated approach based on high-dimensional pattern recognition, brains of meditators were found to be 7.5 years younger […]

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a form of CBT that has been adapted to reduce maladaptive behaviors while changing individuals’ beliefs and perceptions about his or her own depressive thoughts (as cited in Bell, 2015). MBCT may be a useful intervention for diverse populations. Consequently, Bell investigated the effects of mindfulness meditation on anxiety, depression, […]

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The benefits of cardiovascular exercise in improving physical and mental health have been known for several decades (e.g., Szbadi, 1988). More recently, the positive effects of yoga (a form of exercise that incorporates cardio) on disorders such as anxiety, depression, and other mental and physical conditions have been examined (e.g., Büssing, et al., 2012), particularly […]

Studies have found burnout is prevalent among mental health workers (Paris & Hoge, 2010), with 21% to 67% endorsing “high” levels of burnout (Morse, Salyers, Rollins, Monroe-DeVita, & Pfahler, 2012). Burnout occurs when individuals are unable to effectively cope with high levels of prolonged occupational stress. Burnout can be characterized by three distinct dimensions: emotional […]

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The incorporation of a Westernized and decontextualized version of mindfulness into psychotherapy over the last two decades has been a significant trend, while for a hip segment of the popular culture, it has become nothing less than a rage. Although not yet as ubiquitous in the marketplace as yoga, it is certainly nipping at its […]

The past decade has seen a spike in research testing the use of mindfulness in the treatment of many physical and mental health problems. As one example of the increasing popularity, a PsycInfo search using the keyword “mindfulness” identified 2,672 peer-reviewed articles published through 2014. When citations are separated by year, the recent popularity is […]

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I was recently asked to be part of panel of psychotherapists who use the theories of Carl Rogers in their practice. I had to take a few minutes to really think about it. Am I a person-centered therapist? Upon reflection, I realized that some of the best ways I am a therapist, I am a […]

Much of life is spent in motion—physical , mental/emotional, relational , and especially neural motion. Our conscious and non-conscious brain continually scans and interprets this motion, allowing us to focus our attention on other needs and desires, rather than having to pay attention to each motion as it occurs. In the absence of this scanning, […]