Articles Tagged "supervision"

Supervision will be introduced to students in many graduate cohorts as an aspect of their training they will both enjoy and endure. Framing it this way inherently leads students to start to question what they want in a supervisor. Some will think of the worst and ponder what it would be like to have a […]

Introduction Perceived safety in the supervisor-supervisee relationship can influence the level of supervisee self-disclosure (e.g., of mistakes, countertransference, or personal factors such as self-care; Gunn & Pistole, 2012), as well as supervisee outcomes (e.g., self-awareness and self-confidence in session with clients; Johnston & Milne, 2012; Wheeler & Richards, 2007). The development of safety in this […]

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Not as Urgent as a Toothache (JM)           The Analyst stares into the steam of his green tea. A morning Rorschach for no one to interpret.           The first of his five patients for the day is out in the waiting room, flicking through one of the […]

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The breakneck speed of working on an inpatient behavioral medicine team of an urban tertiary hospital is quite often both exhilarating and exhausting for clinical psychology doctoral students. There is an idiosyncratic rhythm to the workload, as new consults roll in or patients the service follows are readmitted to the hospital. The expectation for trainees […]

https://societyforpsychotherapy.org/teaching-learning-evidence-based-relationships/ Like many of you, at the heart of my professional identity lies a psychotherapy relationship researcher. While my specific interests have changed and evolved over time, this aspect of my professional identity has always remained constant. This part of me has delivered professional talks about the relationship, has studied it under the lens of […]

Freud (1913) invented the application of self-reflection to psychotherapy by making himself the subject and the object of the first therapy. He used one of his own dreams as the specimen dream in his breakthrough book, The Interpretation of Dreams, because it was in thinking about this dream that his early ideas came into focus. […]

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Introduction Supervision is a crucial aspect of training and psychology trainees gain many benefits from it (Hook, Watkins, Davis, Owen, Van Tongeren, & Ramos, 2016). The supervisors’ actions guide the psychology trainees to help them increase their treatment knowledge and improve their abilities to apply that knowledge (Wrape, Callahan, Ruggero, & Watkins, 2015). Supervision is […]

Psychology predoctoral interns face many challenges, as difficult roles and competing expectations may lead to burnout. Edelwich (1980) defined burnout as “a progressive loss of idealism, energy, and purpose by people in the helping professions as a result of the conditions of their work” (p. 14). Common factors contributing to burnout include difficult cases, feeling […]

Download a free accompanying PowerPoint presentation from Dr. Barnett here. Clinical supervision is an essential aspect of the training of every psychotherapist (Bernard & Goodyear, 2014). It supplements and significantly adds to the academic education that those in training receive. Clinical supervision received during one’s training can lay the foundation for the neophyte psychotherapist’s clinical […]

Abstract Self-reference refers to clinician revelations about themselves. Theory and research on self-reference are limited by a lack of uniform conceptualizations. This paper discusses two types of self-reference, self-disclosure, and self-involving responses. Included are definitions of each type of self-reference; description of definitional inconsistencies in the literature; discussion of prevalence, functions, and the multidimensional nature […]

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