Articles Tagged "supervision"

As a newly minted post-doctoral fellow, I have repeatedly encouraged junior trainees to eat lunch, talk about their pets, get candy from my candy bowl, or offer to get them coffee if I am already headed out to get my own. At its core, I am trying to model and foster self-care amongst trainees in […]

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Nov 16, 2019

Developing one’s identity and skills as a teacher and mentor is a highly rewarding, but also challenging, task. One of the challenges comes from the fact that we as graduate students have multiple responsibilities and commitments and often struggle to find time and energy to actively pursue teaching/mentoring on top of research, clinical work, and […]

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Introduction Clinical supervision comes in many different shapes and sizes. However, clinical supervision remains, at its core, a professional relationship in which the supervisor provides instruction and guidance in order to further develop the supervisee’s knowledge, skills, and attitudes in clinical practice (Falender & Shafranske, 2004; Falender & Shafranske, 2014). Although the style of supervision […]

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Oct 30, 2019

Like other helping professions (e.g., physical health service providers), psychotherapists are expected to serve clients without expecting anything in return (Guy, 2000). Although the helping within psychotherapy is unidirectional, therapy involves a bidirectional flow in which the client and the therapist impact each other (Kottler, 2010). The role of a psychotherapist departs from other helping […]

Supervision will be introduced to students in many graduate cohorts as an aspect of their training they will both enjoy and endure. Framing it this way inherently leads students to start to question what they want in a supervisor. Some will think of the worst and ponder what it would be like to have a […]

Introduction Perceived safety in the supervisor-supervisee relationship can influence the level of supervisee self-disclosure (e.g., of mistakes, countertransference, or personal factors such as self-care; Gunn & Pistole, 2012), as well as supervisee outcomes (e.g., self-awareness and self-confidence in session with clients; Johnston & Milne, 2012; Wheeler & Richards, 2007). The development of safety in this […]

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Not as Urgent as a Toothache (JM)           The Analyst stares into the steam of his green tea. A morning Rorschach for no one to interpret.           The first of his five patients for the day is out in the waiting room, flicking through one of the […]

The breakneck speed of working on an inpatient behavioral medicine team of an urban tertiary hospital is quite often both exhilarating and exhausting for clinical psychology doctoral students. There is an idiosyncratic rhythm to the workload, as new consults roll in or patients the service follows are readmitted to the hospital. The expectation for trainees […]

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Dec 12, 2018

https://societyforpsychotherapy.org/teaching-learning-evidence-based-relationships/ Like many of you, at the heart of my professional identity lies a psychotherapy relationship researcher. While my specific interests have changed and evolved over time, this aspect of my professional identity has always remained constant. This part of me has delivered professional talks about the relationship, has studied it under the lens of […]

Freud (1913) invented the application of self-reflection to psychotherapy by making himself the subject and the object of the first therapy. He used one of his own dreams as the specimen dream in his breakthrough book, The Interpretation of Dreams, because it was in thinking about this dream that his early ideas came into focus. […]

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