Articles Tagged "therapeutic alliance"

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May 19, 2024

It was in 2017 when I started to teach English to a group of refugees in the UK and became aware of the immense difficulties they faced in their lives. Many of them openly discussed the dangerous journeys they undertook to arrive in the UK. Several of these individuals had experienced or witnessed their boats […]

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Feb 24, 2024

Harm of Stigma with Borderline Personality Disorder “Manipulative,” “attention seekers,” and “drama queens” are a few damaging ways clients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are often described; these individuals are among the most stigmatized within a clinical population (Allan, 2018; Deans & Meocevic, 2006; National Alliance on Mental Health, 2017). BPD is a disorder centered […]

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Jan 24, 2024

It was one of those mornings after a long wedding weekend. I was happy and excited to meet my therapist and tell her about the fun and exciting events that took place. At that point of my life, waking up happy was a rare experience for me.  This was just a month into the start […]

The therapeutic alliance (Bordin, 1979) remains one of the most studied constructs in psychotherapy outcome research (Norcross & Lambert, 2019), and is a robust predictor of client outcome (Flückiger et al., 2018; 2020; Wampold & Imel, 2015). It has been established that therapists vary in their ability to build and maintain an effective alliance, which […]

It is rare when a collection of a single author’s papers is neither disjointed or repetitious. So, it was a particular delight to read “The Art of Bohart.” It is also a particularly apropos title. Although he acknowledges a keen understanding of the science of therapeutic approaches, Bohart argues that it is the artistry that […]

Given the unresolved nature of the Dodo Bird Verdict (de Felice et al., 2019), clarification of psychotherapy mechanisms remains important and may indicate which clients will respond to treatment (Goldfried et al., 2014), reduce theory-practice gaps (Dobson & Beshai, 2013), and provide insight into why some individuals in control groups show improvement above and beyond […]

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For more than 20 years, our attachment research teams at Western Michigan University (WMU) have been using Bowlby’s attachment theory to examine important psychotherapy process and outcome variables. What have we found? Generally speaking, client and therapist attachment do matter in psychotherapy—often times, in many of the same ways that John Bowlby would have predicted. […]

Abstract The therapeutic relationship and responsiveness/treatment adaptations rightfully occupy a prominent, evidence-based place in any guidelines for the psychological treatment of trauma. In this light, we critique the misguided efforts of the American Psychological Association’s (APA, 2017) Clinical Practice Guideline on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Adults to advance a biomedical model for psychotherapy and thus […]

Background Thousands of clinical trials and naturalistic studies have now been conducted on the effects of psychotherapy. Reviews of this research have shown that about 75% of those who enter treatment in clinical trials show some benefit (Lambert, 2013). This finding generalizes across a wide range of disorders except for severe biologically based disturbances (e.g., […]