Articles Tagged "competency"

“Do that scale again.” “Do that fingering transition again.” “Let me hear that again.”  Even if the scale was correct, it had to be done…again. As a novice musician, the word, “again,” became synonymous with repetitive practice. Practice for the sake of practice, because practice makes perfect. I (voice of 3rd author; true story) had […]

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The importance of considering individual differences and diversity in our clinical work has rightly received increased attention in recent years. The relevance of individual differences and diversity to all aspects of the professional services psychologists provide is clearly articulated in the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (Ethics Code, APA, 2010) in Principle […]

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In 2012, the American Psychological Association (APA) endorsed as policy, The Education and Training Guidelines: A Taxonomy for Education and Training in Professional Psychology Health Service Specialties, hereafter referred to as “the Taxonomy.” This Taxonomy was developed in response to confusing inconsistencies across education and training in professional psychology training programs that would describe offerings […]

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Counseling psychology has demonstrated a long-standing interest and respect for clinical supervision as a unique domain that warrants its own preparation for practice. Counseling psychologists have distinguished themselves in the supervision literature (e.g., Borders et al., 1991; Goodyear et al., 2000), and counseling psychology programs have been much more likely than clinical and school psychology […]

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Clinical supervision has changed dramatically in the past decade. First came the recognition that clinical supervision is a distinct professional practice that requires specific training. This represented a critical change from the previously unspoken assumption that all supervisors were, by virtue of their status, competent—an assumption that elicited strong emotional responses from both supervisees and […]

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Imagine: You’ve been in an accident. Now, your thinking is clouded and unclear, you are terrified that you have lost your ability to reason and think clearly and it might never return, and you have a caseload of clients. What would you do? If you didn’t (or couldn’t) turn to anyone, is there someone in […]

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Clinical supervision is an essential aspect of the training of every psychotherapist (Bernard & Goodyear, 2014). It supplements and significantly adds to the academic education that those in training receive. Clinical supervision received during one’s training can lay the foundation for the neophyte psychotherapist’s clinical competence and professional identity. Thus, supervisors play an extremely important […]

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Download a free accompanying Power Point presentation from Dr. Barnett here: Integrating_Religion_and_Spirituality.ppt It may be easy for psychotherapists to overlook or avoid addressing our clients’ spirituality and religion in psychotherapy. Such issues may not have been addressed in our training and thus may not be seen as relevant to our clinical work with clients. After all, we […]

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“… when all four levels of the systems contextual framework were accounted for, and when training involved active learning (e.g., practice in delivery of interventions, feedback, coaching), therapist adherence to EBP was improved and client change occurred.”

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A recent Special Section of Psychotherapy (2010, Volume 47, Issue 1) provides a series of articles that describe key psychotherapy competencies conceptualized across a range of theoretical models with the aim of articulating specific implications for competency-based psychotherapy training. The development of professional competencies is increasingly emphasized in the training of psychologists. This series of articles provides an […]

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