Articles Tagged "group therapy"

Abstract The use of outcome monitoring systems to identify clients that are at-risk for treatment failure has now become part of daily clinical practice, shown in 25 empirical studies to improve client outcomes. These promising findings have led to outcome monitoring systems being recognized as evidence-based. Feedback systems based on client perception of therapeutic processes […]

In the competition between therapy modalities in the United States today, group psychotherapy is clearly on the ropes. As I write these words, the Commission for the Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology (CRSPPP) of the American Psychological Association is considering another petition offered by APA Division 49 (Group Psychotherapy) to have group […]

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Psychotherapists are becoming busier every day and are constantly trying to manage the many different responsibilities they have with the increase in demand for psychological services.  Responsibilities can include assessment, treatment planning, clinical preparation, individual therapy, group therapy, case management, case consultation, documentation, coordinating care, supervision, training, and outreach.  One setting that has been heavily […]

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Residential wilderness therapy or adventure therapy is “the prescriptive use of adventure experiences provided by mental health professionals, often conducted in natural settings that kinesthetically engage clients on cognitive, affective, and behavioral levels.” (Gass, Gillis & Russell, 2012 p.1).  The term adventure therapy is used in the literature interchangeably with “wilderness therapy” (Russell, 2001) and […]

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The importance of group composition – the particular blend of patient characteristics in a therapy group – is widely recognized by group psychotherapists.  Skilled clinicians try to have an ideal composition in mind when selecting patients for group therapy.  Notwithstanding such ideals, the task of selecting group members is complicated by the fact that no […]

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Although the existing group art therapy literature focuses on identifying art therapy directives and describing the root of group psychotherapy as being geared toward verbal therapy (Liebmann, 2004; Steinbach, 2014), there has been a gap in the literature when it comes to describing the healing components of art in group work. The second edition of […]

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Abstract Group psychotherapy provides unique opportunities for clinical errors in the selection of patients and composition of therapy groups. This article introduces some of the difficulties and complexities that can be associated with group composition and patient selection errors. Clinical vignettes from psychodynamic/interpersonal psychotherapy groups are used to illustrate three variations of group composition and selection errors. The […]

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Chronic pain is a debilitating symptom that may or may not have an organic cause. In rural communities, chronic pain may be more difficult to treat due to patients’ limited access to care, lower socioeconomic status (SES), and geographic isolation (Thorn et al., 2011). Psychosocial approaches are viable options for treatment, including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy […]

by | Sep 15, 2014 | Supervision & Training

In the realm of group counselor training and development, an emerging area of research has addressed how novices differ from experts in their organization of domain knowledge. Existing research has investigated experts and novices’ knowledge structure about group members (Kivlighan, Markin, Stahl, & Salahuddin, 2007; Kivlighan & Quigley, 1991) and group leader interventions (Kivlighan & […]

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