Articles Tagged "self-disclosure"

by
Mar 8, 2020

As of May 2018, approximately 50 million Americans are using online and mobile app dating services (hereafter referred to as “online dating”; Seetharaman & Wells, 2018). With one out of five relationships now starting online (Cacioppo et al., 2013; Hamilton, 2016), mental health professionals and graduate students are likely using these services. Indeed, a recent […]

Be the 1st to vote.

Introduction Perceived safety in the supervisor-supervisee relationship can influence the level of supervisee self-disclosure (e.g., of mistakes, countertransference, or personal factors such as self-care; Gunn & Pistole, 2012), as well as supervisee outcomes (e.g., self-awareness and self-confidence in session with clients; Johnston & Milne, 2012; Wheeler & Richards, 2007). The development of safety in this […]

Be the 1st to vote.

My Confusion About and Interest in Therapist Self-Disclosure (TSD) As I begin to establish my private practice, I have been reflecting on the evolution of my thoughts about and use of therapist self-disclosure (TSD), which I am using here to mean "therapist statements that reveal something personal about the therapist" (Hill & Knox, 2002, p. […]

by
Mar 11, 2018

In offering further commentary to the article on Caucasian therapist self-disclosure to cultural minority populations, it is important to begin by more generally acknowledging both individual and between group differences. This is an important beginning because aspects of cultural competency are so often avoided as a larger subject through the statement ‘everyone is different.’ While […]

If, indeed, the personal is political and the political is personal, where does that leave psychotherapists—whose profession is intensely personal—when clients voice strong political views counter to ours or when their political stress resonates with our own sense of a rending of the civic and cultural fabric of the country? In the aftermath of one […]

by
Oct 24, 2017

Within the conceptual literature, multicultural therapeutic approaches have long recognized therapist self-disclosure as a skill or even competency (Bitar, Kimball, Bermúdez, & Drew, 2014; Henretty & Levitt, 2010). Self-disclosure has been discussed as an intervention that may build trust and credibility in cross-cultural contexts (Constantine & Kwan, 2003; Henretty & Levitt, 2010). Disclosure may suggest […]

by
Jan 22, 2015

I was recently at a lecture where an audience member asked the speaker, psychologist Dr. Richard Schwartz, about his stance on the role of therapist self-disclosure. Dr. Schwartz paused for a moment before responding that he often urges supervisees to bring to mind the acronym WAIT before engaging in self-disclosure in a session (personal communication, […]

by
Jan 4, 2015

In Laska, Gurman, & Wampold (2014) and Laska & Wampold (2014) I discussed how to improve the quality of mental health care from a common factor (CF) perspective. Unfortunately, one fundamental misunderstanding of CF theory is that “anything goes” and therapists can do whatever they want. Let me be crystal clear, from a CF perspective, […]

by
Sep 25, 2014

Mental health clinicians make decisions based on their respective ethical codes daily. Certain ethical standards, such as abstaining from sexual relations with clients, are clear. Other decisions, particularly those involving nuanced clinical judgment, can be more complex. Psychologists who treat clients struggling with an eating disorder frequently face common ethical dilemmas such as therapist competence, […]

by
Jun 7, 2014

Abstract Self-reference refers to clinician revelations about themselves. Theory and research on self-reference are limited by a lack of uniform conceptualizations. This paper discusses two types of self-reference, self-disclosure, and self-involving responses. Included are definitions of each type of self-reference; description of definitional inconsistencies in the literature; discussion of prevalence, functions, and the multidimensional nature […]

Be the 1st to vote.