Articles Tagged "training" (Page 2)

Abstract Supervision is often conceived of as the “instructional strategy that most characterizes the preparation of mental health professionals” (Bernard & Goodyear, 2019; p. 2). Engaging in this process fully and authentically inevitably involves being vulnerable in front of and with one’s supervisor in an effort to learn and grow. To more fully understand the […]

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Dec 2, 2021

Nine days before my first internship application was due, I learned that an ex-patient of mine, Theodore (name changed for confidentiality), died by suicide. I know receiving this kind of news can never come at a good time, but this was a particularly vulnerable time for me. I was feeling insecure, questioning myself, scared about […]

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Nov 15, 2021

The Seventh Edition of Bergin and Garfield’s Handbook for Psychotherapy and Behavior Change, edited by Michael Barkham, Wolfgang Lutz, and Louis Castonguay, and published by Wiley, is due out this summer (Amazon says September 22, 2021)! This book is considered the “lodestar” or “bible” for psychotherapists and psychotherapy researchers…it reviews the major research in the […]

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Context Before psychotherapy, there often comes a phone consultation. When I ask prospective clients how they felt about prior therapy, the most common account is of a therapist whom they regarded as a kind, non-judgmental listener, but not much else. They wonder if they were properly challenged, if there could have been more guidance, or […]

Research suggests that therapist personality traits impact self-reported theoretical orientation (e.g., Ogunfowora & Drapeau, 2008). For example, studies have shown that therapists who report having a psychodynamic orientation generally report being higher in creativity, intuition, imagination, individualism, anxiety, and introversion (Arthur, 2001). In contrast, Arthur’s (2001) research showed that cognitive-behavioral therapists were more conventional, rational, […]

My name is Erin, and I am working towards my doctorate degree in counseling psychology. I was drawn to this field because of my interest in the complex identities that shape the human experience. Each identity we hold creates a unique perspective through which we view the world. In some aspects, our identities are easily […]

Given that mental health professionals lead lives outside the therapy room, they are not invulnerable to the impact of psychosocial life stressors. In addition, working with distressed patients is a complex and demanding task that requires the service provider’s devoted mental resources. Graduate student trainees in applied psychology programs are arguably prone to even greater […]

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Mar 8, 2020

As of May 2018, approximately 50 million Americans are using online and mobile app dating services (hereafter referred to as “online dating”; Seetharaman & Wells, 2018). With one out of five relationships now starting online (Cacioppo et al., 2013; Hamilton, 2016), mental health professionals and graduate students are likely using these services. Indeed, a recent […]

As a newly minted post-doctoral fellow, I have repeatedly encouraged junior trainees to eat lunch, talk about their pets, get candy from my candy bowl, or offer to get them coffee if I am already headed out to get my own. At its core, I am trying to model and foster self-care amongst trainees in […]

Introduction Clinical supervision comes in many different shapes and sizes. However, clinical supervision remains, at its core, a professional relationship in which the supervisor provides instruction and guidance in order to further develop the supervisee’s knowledge, skills, and attitudes in clinical practice (Falender & Shafranske, 2004; Falender & Shafranske, 2014). Although the style of supervision […]