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Congratulations to the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy 2018 Award Winners and Grant Recipients!

Distinguished Psychologist Award 

Jacques Barber

Jacques P. Barber, Ph.D., ABPP is Professor and Dean, Gordon F Derner School of Psychology formerly the Institute of Advanced Studies in Psychology at Adelphi University.  He is professor of psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and in the Psychology Graduate Group at the University of Pennsylvania.  He is also Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine.  He is past president of the International Society for Psychotherapy Research and was a recipient of its early career award in 1996 and its Distinguished Research Career Award in 2014.  He has been visiting professor at the Department of Clinical Neuroscience of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm.  He is a licensed clinical psychologist in New York and Pennsylvania.

His research focuses on the outcome and process of psychodynamic and cognitive therapies for depression, panic disorder, substance dependence and personality disorders. He has been funded by NIMH and NIDA to conduct randomized clinical trials involving psychodynamic and cognitive therapy.  Guided by conceptual models emphasizing both relational and technical factors, his psychotherapy process research examines the impact of the therapeutic alliance and of therapists’ use of theoretically relevant interventions on the outcome of different therapies.  Outside of treatment research, he has also conducted research on individual core conflicts and metacognitiion in different populations including Children of Holocaust Survivors.  He has published more than 250 papers, chapters and books in the field of psychotherapy and personality.  He is mostly proud of the students and post docs he has mentored during his career.

Among his recent books are “Psychodynamic Therapy: A Guide to Evidence-Based Practice” and “Practicing Psychodynamic Therapy: A Casebook (2014) both with Richard Summers; Visions in Psychotherapy Research and Practice: Reflections from the presidents of the society for psychotherapy research edited with Bernhard Strauss and Louis Georges Castonguay.  "Echoes of the Trauma: Relationship Themes and Emotions in the Narratives of the Children of Holocaust Survivors" co-authored with Hadas Wiseman, and The Therapeutic Alliance: An Evidence-Based Approach to Practice, co-edited with Christopher Muran. 


SAP/APF Early Career Award

Tony Rousmaniere

Tony Rousmaniere is Clinical Faculty at the University of Washington and has a private practice in Seattle.  He hosts the clinical training website www.dpfortherapists.com, and is the author/editor of four books on clinical training: Deliberate Practice for Psychotherapists, The Cycle of Excellence: Using Deliberate Practice to Improve Supervision and Training, Using Technology to Enhance Counseling Training and Supervision: A Practical Handbook, and the forthcoming Building Psychological Capacity: A Deliberate Practice Handbook.  In 2017 Dr. Rousmaniere published an article in The Atlantic Monthly (“What your therapist doesn’t know).  Dr. Rousmaniere provides workshops, webinars, and advanced clinical training and supervision to clinicians in the United States, the United Kingdom, Europe, Asia, and Australia.  Dr. Rousmaniere supports the open-data movement and publishes his aggregated clinical outcome data, in de-identified form, on his website at www.drtonyr.com/outcome-data.  Dr. Rousmaniere is an active member of the Society for Advancement of Psychotherapy (SAP), the Society for Psychotherapy Research (SPR), and the Society for Exploration of Psychotherapy Integration (SEPI).  He was previously Associate Director of Counseling and Director of Training at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Student Health and Counseling Association.  More about Dr. Rousmaniere can be found at www.drtonyr.com

Catherine Eubanks

Catherine F. Eubanks is Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology of Yeshiva University.  She also serves as Associate Director of the Mount Sinai-Beth Israel Brief Psychotherapy Research Program.  Dr. Eubanks’s research interests are in the area of psychotherapy process and outcome, in particular negotiating therapeutic alliance ruptures with patients with personality disorder features.  The goals of her research program are to identify therapist skills and characteristics that are linked to effectiveness across various theoretical orientations, and to explore how therapists’ skills can be enhanced through training.

Dr. Eubanks received the Dissertation Award from the Society for the Exploration of Psychotherapy Integration (SEPI) in 2007 and the Outstanding Early Career Achievement Award from the Society for Psychotherapy Research (SPR) in 2015.  Dr. Eubanks currently serves as President-Elect of SEPI, and recently completed a five-year term as Executive Officer of the North American chapter of SPR.  Dr. Eubanks is an Associate Editor for two journals, the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy Research.  She also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Psychotherapy Integration.


Distinguished Award for the International Advancement of Psychotherapy

Rod Goodyear

Rod Goodyear, PhD., Counseling Psychology, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana) is a Professor at the University of Redlands as well as Emeritus Professor of Counseling Psychology, University of Southern California and was the 2015 President of the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy where his Presidential initiative concerned more fully internationalizing the Society.  His scholarship has focused primarily on processes and outcomes in supervision and training, and secondarily on professional identity in counseling psychology.  His book with Janine Bernard (Fundamentals of Clinical Supervision), in its sixth edition, is arguably the most widely used supervision book.  His recent work has focused on the potential of deliberate practice for therapists (see Rousmaniere, Goodyear, Miller and Wampold’s The Cycle of Excellence).

He was a member of the American Psychological Associations’ task group that developed the Association’s clinical supervision guidelines; and he received the American Psychological Association's 2015 award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to Education and Training. In the past five years his work has become  increasingly international, with collaborations and training projects in Latin America, China, South Korea, and the U.K.


SAP Student Diversity Paper Award

Katherine Morales 

Katherine Morales is a rising third year doctoral student in the Counseling Psychology program at the University of Maryland, College Park. She and her advisor, Dr. Dennis Kivlighan, Jr., have collaboratively developed research projects that integrate his expertise in process and outcome of psychotherapy and her interests in the experiences of racial ethnic minorities. Her research interests include the study of the therapeutic alliance, cultural humility, and multicultural competency. In her leisure time, she loves to read, explore new foods, and travel.


SAP Donald K. Freedheim Student Development Paper Award

Brian TaeHyuk Keum

Brian TaeHyuk Keum is a PhD candidate in Counseling Psychology at the University of Maryland-College Park studying under Dr. Matthew J. Miller. Prior to beginning his PhD program, he received his MA in Counseling Psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University. His research interests include contemporary issues of discrimination and mental health correlates (such as online racism and gendered racism), stigma reduction and promotion of psychological help-seeking, psychotherapy process and outcome research on clients of color, and group perspectives in counselor training. Brian started his counselor training during his Master’s at a community outpatient agency in lower east side of New York City serving primarily low-income immigrant clientele. Since then, he transitioned to providing counseling to college students and community-based clientele in the DMV area for the past four years. Brian is applying for his pre-doctoral internship this upcoming academic year.


SAP Jeffrey E. Barnett Psychotherapy Research Paper Award

Michael Katz

Michael Katz is a rising fourth year doctoral student in Clinical Psychology at the Derner School of Psychology, Adelphi University. Michael began his research training with a focus on LGBTQ mental health as an MA student at the Academic College of Tel Aviv-Yaffo, under the supervision of Dr. Ofer Fein. His current research, under the mentorship of Dr. Mark Hilsenroth of Adelphi University, focuses on psychotherapy process and on the relationship between technique use, flexibility, and outcome within psychodynamic psychotherapy. Michael divides his time and attention between his growing second home in New York and his close family and friends in his home country, Israel.


SAP Mathilda B. Canter Education and Training Paper Award

Taylor Groth

Taylor Groth will begin her third year in the Doctoral Program at the Derner School of Psychology at Adelphi University in the fall. Her Master's Thesis assessed psychologists' willingness to treat suicidal clients, and her dissertation will look at treatment outcome of adolescents with eating disorders. In the future, Taylor hopes to work with children and adolescents, as well as continue to do research. Aside from psychology, in her free time she likes to play soccer and spend time with her dog and family.


SAP Student Excellence in Practice Award

Mariafé Panizo Jansana

Mariafé Panizo is a doctoral student in the Combined Integrated Clinical and School Psychology program at James Madison University, Virginia. She is writing a dissertation on the Interpersonal Reconstructive Therapy (IRT)’s conceptualization and treatment of personality disorders, under the supervision of Dr. Ken Critchfield. During her doctoral training, Mariafé has practiced at several clinical sites, including Western State Hospital, where she is developing an IRT curriculum for group therapy with patients with severe mental disorders. In the future, she wishes to continue working with severely mentally ill adults and other vulnerable populations. Mariafé is originally from Perú, where she obtained a Bachelor’s degree in Philosophy. In 2010, she moved to the USA to pursue a Master’s in Psychological Sciences at James Madison University.


APA Division 29 Student Excellence in Teaching/ Mentorship Award

Alice Coyne

Alice Coyne is a rising fifth year graduate student in Clinical Psychology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Since beginning graduate school, she has worked in Dr. Michael Constantino’s Psychotherapy Research Lab. Alice’s research focuses broadly on psychotherapy process, outcome, and integration, common treatment factors, dyadic analysis of the patient-therapist relationship, therapist effects, psychotherapy training, and interpersonal theory. This work has been disseminated at several professional conferences and in empirical peer-reviewed publications. During her time as a graduate student, Alice has served as a teaching assistant for two undergraduate and two graduate courses. She has also served as a co-mentor for four undergraduate honors students who completed empirical projects focused on psychotherapy process and outcome research. Alice has also served as a methodology consultant for the Center for Research on Families at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.


50th Anniversary Grant

Simon Goldberg

 

Dr. Simon Goldberg completed his PhD in counseling psychology at the University of Wisconsin - Madison under the mentorship of Drs. William Hoyt and Bruce Wampold.  He completed his clinical internship at the Seattle VA and received postdoctoral training in health services research at the Seattle VA and the University of Washington.  Simon will begin a position as assistant professor in the Department of Counseling Psychology at the University of Wisconsin - Madison in August, 2018.  Simon’s work focuses on factors common across psychotherapies, with a particular emphasis on therapists’ contribution to outcome.  He is also interested in the effects of mindfulness- and meditation-based interventions and military veteran mental health.

He will be using the 50th Anniversary Grant to examine correlates of therapist differences (i.e., therapist effects) in naturalistic psychotherapy.  His study will involve assessment of a variety of candidate therapist characteristics, including administering several non-self-report behavioral and performance tasks.  These measures will be used to predict the outcomes of patients treated by these therapists.  He hopes to provide information regarding therapist factors that are associated with superior outcomes in psychotherapy that can be used to inform personnel selection and training.


2018 Norine Johnson, Ph.D. Psychotherapy Research Grant

Sigal Zilcha-Mano 

Sigal Zilcha-Mano is a licensed clinical psychologist, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Department of Psychology, University of Haifa, and a Visiting Associate Professor at the Healthy Aging and Late Life Brain Disorders Program, Columbia University. She heads the Psychotherapy Research Lab at the Department of Psychology, University of Haifa. She is Associate Editor of the Journal of Counseling Psychology, and on the editorial board of Psychotherapy, and of Psychotherapy Research. Her research focuses on active ingredients in psychotherapy and in the placebo effect, which bring about therapeutic change, including the working alliance and the expectancy regarding treatment progress. She investigates the distinct roles these active ingredients may play in different treatments and for different patients, with the aim of laying the foundation for evidence-based, patient-tailored treatment.

Dr. Zilcha-Mano is the recipient of the International Society for Psychotherapy Research Outstanding Early Career Achievement Award, and the Dusty and Ettie Miller Fellowship for Outstanding Young Scholars. She has received several research grants to support her work, including the Fulbright Fellowship (working with Jacques Barber at Adelphi University), as well as research and equipment grants from the Israel Science Foundation and from the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF). The Norine Johnson, PhD, Psychotherapy Research Grant gives her the opportunity to investigate the effects of therapist's use of techniques to counter and complement the patient's attachment orientations, and to examine its potential contribution to optimizing the efficacy of treatments for depression.


2018 Charles J. Gelso, Ph.D., Psychotherapy Research Grants 

Elizabeth Demeusy

Elizabeth Demeusy, M.A. is a doctoral candidate in the Clinical Psychology program at the University of Rochester. Her research interests broadly focus on evidence-based prevention and intervention programs for high-risk youth, specifically those impoverished and with experiences of trauma. In particular, she is interested in child maltreatment prevention and the development of externalizing behavior problems in young children.

With this grant, Elizabeth plans to conduct a follow-up study on a multi-component preventative intervention designed to prevent child maltreatment and support healthy development in newborns of young mothers, for her dissertation. Following graduation, she hopes to continue this line of research by pursuing a career that focuses on the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based practices for disadvantaged children and families.

Robinder Bedi 

Dr. Robinder (Rob) P. Bedi is an associate professor of counselling psychology In the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education at the University of British Columbia.  He has been designated a Senior Research Fellow of the Indian Council of Cultural Relations and  a University of British Columbia Leading Edge Scholar. Dr. Bedi’s current research interests include multicultural and cross-cultural counselling and psychotherapy, particularly in India or with individuals of Asian Indian descent and he conducts research both in India and in North America.

Sigal Zilcha-Mano

Sigal Zilcha-Mano is a licensed clinical psychologist, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Department of Psychology, University of Haifa, and a Visiting Associate Professor at the Healthy Aging and Late Life Brain Disorders Program, Columbia University. She heads the Psychotherapy Research Lab at the Department of Psychology, University of Haifa. She is Associate Editor of the Journal of Counseling Psychology, and on the editorial board of Psychotherapy, and of Psychotherapy Research. Her research focuses on active ingredients in psychotherapy and in the placebo effect, which bring about therapeutic change, including the working alliance and the expectancy regarding treatment progress. She investigates the distinct roles these active ingredients may play in different treatments and for different patients, with the aim of laying the foundation for evidence-based, patient-tailored treatment.

Dr. Zilcha-Mano is the recipient of the International Society for Psychotherapy Research Outstanding Early Career Achievement Award, and the Dusty and Ettie Miller Fellowship for Outstanding Young Scholars. She has received several research grants to support her work, including the Fulbright Fellowship (working with Jacques Barber at Adelphi University), as well as research and equipment grants from the Israel Science Foundation and from the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF). The Norine Johnson, PhD, Psychotherapy Research Grant gives her the opportunity to investigate the effects of therapist's use of techniques to counter and complement the patient's attachment orientations, and to examine its potential contribution to optimizing the efficacy of treatments for depression.


International Research Grant for Students and ECP

Yuye Zhang

Yuye Zhang is a third-year doctoral student in counseling psychology at Ball State University. Originally from China, she is interested in the counseling process with Chinese clients, especially the Chinese cultural influences on clients' emotional experience in psychotherapy. She is keen on bridging the research-practice gap.


Diversity Research Grants

Shondolyn Sanders

Shondolyn is a fourth year Counseling Psychology doctoral student at the University of Memphis.  She received a M.S in Counseling (Clinical rehabilitation) from the University of Memphis and a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville.  She was born and raised in West Memphis, AR and is the oldest of 5.  Her research areas of interest include multicultural supervision and training, chronic illness adjustment, the transitioning of children with disabilities to adulthood, and health disparities specific to ethnic/racial minority individuals.  Her dissertation focuses on the supervision experiences of ethnic minority psychology graduate students.  She is currently a pre-doctoral intern at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center-VA track.  Her favorite pastime is being the best aunt ever.

Joey Sergi

Joey Sergi is a fourth year Clinical Psychology doctoral student at Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University. She holds a Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology from Ferkauf and a Bachelor’s degree in Anthropology from Wagner College. She is currently a pre-doctoral extern at the Manhattan Veterans Affairs Medical Center where she is working on developing an integrative approach to treatment that balances the common factors across therapeutic approaches.  Joey’s research interests include the therapeutic alliance, therapeutic rupture and repair, and multicultural and cross-cultural psychotherapy, especially with individuals who identity as sexual minorities. Her dissertation will explore the impact of therapist-committed microaggressions on the therapeutic alliance for LGBTQ individuals. Through this project, she will examine the effect of therapist attempts to acknowledge and resolve these difficult moments when they occur in session. Ultimately, Joey hopes that the findings of her study will contribute to enhancing therapeutic outcomes for clients of diverse backgrounds by allowing her to develop an empirically-supported and culturally sensitive rupture-repair framework to aid clinicians in working cross-culturally.

 

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